Volcanic Springs

Geysers, Hot Springs,
Mud Pots, and Fumaroles

Potts Hot Spring Basin

Just like Lake Shore Group also Potts Hot Spring Basin is closed to the public and can only be observed from a viewpoint close to the highway or by boat from the lake. The area is named after Daniel T. Potts, a trapper who mentioned the springs in a letter in 1827. Potts Hot Spring Basin is a very dynamic area. Over time, more than 40 geysers have been observed, most of which small, but some have shown eruptions of size and even got informal names, such as Resurgent Geyser, Mercurial Geyser, or Explosion Pool. Geyser activity is subjected to substantial changes, dependend on energy surges, usually lasting for only a relatively short period of time. Up until 1970 the main road along Yellowstone Lake traversed Potts Basin on the shore and there was also a boardwalk. However, the road has been rerouted and the boardwalk removed, so nowadays the area is no longer accessible to ordinary visitors. From the viewpoint you can overlook the Mercurial Group and small parts of the Beach Group. In contrast, the Empty Hole Group in the south is not visible.

Northern section of upper and lower Mercurial Group, seen from the overlook:

Mercurial Group Yellowstone

Mercurial Group

Some features of the Mercurial Group in more detail:

Mercurial Group Yellowstone

Potts Hot Spring Basin, Mercurial Group

Southern section of the upper Mercurial Group:

Mercurial Group Yellowstone

Mercurial Group

Some features of the lower Mercurial Group in more detail:

Lower Mercurial Group Yellowstone

Mercurial Group

Features of the lower Mercurial Group farther to the south:

Lower Mercurial Group Yellowstone

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