Volcanic Springs

Geysers, Hot Springs,
Mud Pots, and Fumaroles

Lower River Group - east side of Firehole River - page 2

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West of Azure Spring, on the way back to the river, several features perforate the ground, among them the small geyser UNNG-RVG-4 (LRNN122 in the RCN database) and the hot spring LRNN121.

Geyser UNNG-RVG-4 (LRNN122):

Geyser UNNG-RVG-4 LRNN122 Yellowstone

Hot Spring LRNN121:

Hot Pool Spring LRNN121 Yellowstone

Back at the river, Cavern Spring and Bath Spring occupy the bank. Just as little as Bath Spring, featuring a temperature of 92 °C (197 °F), can be recommended for bathing, the dangers of Cavern Spring should be underestimated. In August 2000 three park employees, two 18-year-old boys and a 20-year-old girl, tried to jump hand in hand over Cavern Spring after a swim at night in Yellowstone River. However, in the twilight they misjudged its true nature and dimensions from the direction they were approaching. All three landed on the opposite side at the very edge of the spring, which gave way and precipitated them into the 81 °C (178 °F) hot water. While the boys survived badly scalded, the girl died from her severe burns the next day. The whole scary story in the minutest detail can be found in the book Death in Yellowstone by Lee H. Whittlesey.

Cavern Spring:

Cavern Spring Yellowstone

Cavern Spring, Sara Hulphers, Lance Buchi, Yellowstone

Bath Spring:

Bath Spring Yellowstone

Bath Spring Yellowstone
The next noticeable feature farther upstream is the hot pool LRNN158 at a very pictorial position on top of a sinter mound above the river. Across the river you can spot the runoff and little steam plume of Mound Geyser.

Hot Spring LRNN158:

Hot Pool Spring LRNN158 Yellowstone

East of LRNN158 another named pool, Diadem Spring, shows up. Back in the 1970s Diadem was known for massive, periodical overflows. But then activity declined and the spring cooled down.

Diadem Spring:

Diadem Spring Yellowstone

Diadem Spring Yellowstone
The steep river bank continues south of LRNN158 and is also home of Cone Spring and, a little bit upstream, Horn Spring. From time to time some tiny splashes from their vents on top can be observed.

Cone Spring, slightly squirting:

Cone Spring Yellowstone

Cone Spring Yellowstone

Horn Spring, Cone Spring in background:

Horn Spring Yellowstone

Horn Spring Yellowstone
Pocket Basin Geyser lies close to the southern boundary of the Lower River Group. As a cyclic geyser it undergoes several periods of overflowing and draining, before the eruption occurs. However, intervals are covering a broad range, from less than an hour to several days. The eruption may reach up to 3 m (15 feet) height.

Pocket Basin Geyser:

Pocket Basin Geyser Yellowstone

Pocket Basin Geyser Yellowstone
If you proceed farther, you reach after approximately 250 m (275 yards) the upper section of the River Group, comprising e.g. Armored Spring and Fortress Geyser.



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